CORANG PEAK CIRCUIT

CORANG PEAK CIRCUIT – BUDAWANG RANGES, MORTON NATIONAL PARK, NSW

 

About 25Km and 350m climb, along a foot track (rough in parts)

 

This was another multi club Wednesday Walk led by good friend, Mike S. It commenced and ended at the Wog Wog entrance (near Nerriga)  in Morton N.P..  As it is a long drive from Canberra ( the road winds a great deal) we met up and left from the nearby town of Queanbeyan at 7.30 am.  There were 9 of us and we managed to fit into only 2 cars.

At the track head there is a most attractive, and free, camping area with pit toilet. We started walking at 9.20 am. All day, Mike kept up the same fast pace, needed given the distance of the walk and the distance from Canberra, but leaving no time for flower photography.

From the track head we dropped down 30 metres to Wog Wog Creek which was at the lowest leveI I have ever seen.   From there it was a long, slow steady climb with a few   easy descents, through open forest.  Eventually we reached the sandstone heathlands , with scattered eucalypts, but mostly heaths and tea tree and banksia scrub.  This is the southern limit of the geological area known as the Sydney Basin.  The Budawang Ranges are a series of  mesas – flat-topped hills, usually ringed by cliffs, and separated by river valleys.  The mesa tops are mainly the heathlands, lying in shallow soils on underlying sandstone.   The further we walked across these heath lands the better  wildflowers.  And the better the views.   Eventually we reached Corang Peak.  A short sharp climb and we were on the summit, with magnificent right across the Budawangs.

From Corang Peak we dropped down to Corang Arch, lying just off the side of a sandstone plateau,  where we had lunch.

After lunch we descended what is known as the  Conglomerate Slope to the valley floor and followed the foot pad downstream alongside Canowie Brook to the Corang River  (this foot track is not shown on the 1:25000 Corang topo map).  It is fairly rough, and in places is hard to follow)  .  We came to  what is called the Rock Rib and then Corang Lagoon.   From Corang Lagoon we left the Corang River, following the foot track south and then south west,  crossing a number of creek, including Goodsell Creek, each of which necessitated a descent into the semi rainforest of the creek bed and then a climb back up again.   Eventually we rejoined the outward path and the long section back to the track head.

During the afternoon  we had 2-3 light showers and some thunder.    It was a pleasure to use my lightweight, but strong, hiking umbrella from Helinox.   I would have broiled in my rain jacket on this very warm and humid day.   Even though the path wound through scrub it was possible, with care, to use it.  From my reading of the blogs of long distance hikers in the USA , umbrellas are popular but in Australia they  seem to be looked down on as being inappropriate for “real” bushwalkers.   But as in the USA, I have also found my umbrella a godsend in hot weather, giving me permanent shade during a walk and a much cooler hike with less need for water.   I noticed that Phil B also had a similar Helinox umbrella and also like me, was using the extremely light and strong Helinox trekking poles.

We must have got back to the cars somewhere between 5.30 and 6.00 pm. It was just on 7.45 pm when I arrived home, 30 minutes from the meeting place of the morning.

This is a great walk – thanks Mike.   It was also a great party to walk with,  everyone getting on so well together and all evenly matched in stamina and speed, keeping easily together as a group.  Thanks for your company Mike S, Judy G, Shirley G, Phil B,  Chris R,  Cynthia B,  Eric D,  Leigh H.

1-track-head-wog-wog-entrance-morton-np

the track head

2

3

4-morning-tea-a-conglomerate-outcrop

morning tea spot – a conglomerate outcrop

6-morning-tea-on-the-conglomerate-outcrop

Morning Tea atop a conglomerate outcrop

5

view from morning tea spot.

7

Hiking the trail

8-epacris-sp

Epacris sp.

9-entering-a-pass-through-a-conglomerate-outcrop

entering a pass through a conglomerate outcrop

10-a-pass-through-a-conglomerate-outcrop

the pass through the conglomerate outcrop

11-sandstone-conglomerate

Conglomerate

12-descending-the-pass-through-a-conglomerate-outcrop

descending the pass through the conglomerate outcrop

13-leptospermum-sp-tea-tree

leptospermum sp. (Tea Tree, but a shrub not a tree!)

14

15-blandfordia-sp-christmas-bells

Blandfordia (Christmas Bells)

16-through-the-scrub-and-heaths

Out of the forest now  and across the heathlands

16a-corang-peak-on-right

Corang Peak. We still have quite a way to go to get there

17-view-of-pidgeon-house-mountain

Pigeon House Mountain

18-pidgeon-house-mtn

Pigeon House Mountain

21-from-corang-pk

From Corang Peak. Mts Donjon, Cole and Owen

22-from-corang-pk-towards-corang-arch

From Corang Peak. Mts. Hoddle, Haughton and Tarn (l-r)  The Budawangs are an incredible place, remote, very few tracks, a sublime wilderness of great beauty.  How lucky we are. 

23-corang-peak-from-corang-arch

Looking back to Corang Peak from near Corang Arch

24-corang-arch-on-left

Corang Arch on the left. There is a huge overhang  under Phil in the red shirt which faces the Arch

30-corang-arch

Corang Arch from the overhang or cave

25-lunch-overlooking-corang-arch-photo-by-shirley-g

Overlooking Corang Arch. Lunch. Cynthia examines a hole which gives access to the Arch.

26-corang-arch

Corang Arch. Judy, Leigh and Cynthia

27-corang-arch

Judy, Cynthia and Leigh on Corang Arch. Hmm, how do I get down?

28-myself-on-corang-arch

myself on Corang Arch. Photo by Shirley G.

29-corang-arch-by-shirley

Corang Arch from a hole in the rock wall which gives access to it. Photo by Shirley G.

31-from-corang-arch-looking-across-at-the-huge-overhang

The huge overhang on the main wall which looks onto Corang Arch

32a-descending-the-conglomerate-slope

Descending the Conglomerate Slope (photo from a previous hike)

33-from-the-congloerate-slope

Looking back, commencing the descent of the Conglomerate Slope

34-view-from-the-congomerate-slope

View from the Conglomerate Slope. Corang Arch is just around the corner

35-coming-down-the-conglomerate-slope

descending the Conglomerate Slope.  Shirley fearlessly leads the way with Judy on her heels.

 

36-descending-the-rock-ribs-to-the-corang-river

Rock Rib and Corang River. River is just seen left of centre

37-descending-the-rock-ribs-to-the-corang-river

Looking down on Corang River from Rock Rib

38-looking-downstream-from-the-rock-ribs

Corang River immediately downstream from Rock Ribs

38-rock-ribs-corang-river

Rock Ribs and Corang River

38a-from-the-rock-ribs

Rock Ribs and Corang River

39-swimming-at-the-rock-ribs-corang-river

Swimming at the Rock Ribs, Corang River

40-corang-lagoon

Corang Lagoon, Corang River

41-drosera-spatulata-sundew-corang-lagoon-800x600

Drosera sp. (Sundew) a carnivorous plant.

 

 

 

 

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